New Years Dinner

To celebrate the beginning of the New Year, the Vastenhouw lab had a delicious meal at Fischhaus Dresden. This idyllic restaurant is situated at the edge of the forest and with freshly fallen snow, the atmosphere was magical.

Methods Article in ‘Development’

We are happy to post about our lab’s recent publication in Development. The article describes how to label and analyze single mRNA molecules, within single cells, at different stages of the zebrafish embryo’s development. With this technique, we hope to open new avenues into gene expression patterns and cellular differentiation programs.

The project was chiefly driven Carine Stapel, currently a PhD student in the Vastenhouw Lab. Carine developed the experimental protocol. The associated, freely available image analysis and quantification pipeline was developed in collaboration with Gene Myer’s research group as well as the Scientific Computing Facility. In fact, all work was done in-house at the MPI-CBG, demonstrating the institute’s wide array of qualifications as well as its collaborative spirit.

The article and protocol are available from Development, and the article also contains the analysis pipeline in its Supplementary Information. Article Page at Development

Automated detection and quantification of single RNAs at cellular resolution in zebrafish embryos

L. Carine StapelBenoit LombardotColeman BroaddusDagmar KainmuellerFlorian JugEugene W. MyersNadine L. Vastenhouw; 
Advent Calendar 2015

Tea and Sweets Advent Calendar

The Vastenhouw lab has, largely by Max’s initiative, developed the tradition of an advent calendar – consisting of a tea and sweets combination for every day from December 1st to December 24th. This year, it was upgraded with a beautiful line of numbered, wooden clips counting up to Christmas Eve. It displays the teas very nicely.

Yuko, Lennart, and LZ1

Short Visit from Yuko Sato

Our collaborator Yuko Sato paid us a short visit from Japan. Yuko is a Kimura Lab Members at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, who develop innovative in vivo imaging approaches targeting post-translational modifications.

During the visit, Yuko and Lennart executed pilot experiments for light sheet-based in vivo imaging. We hope the photo conveys our joy at the last, successful attempt at our experiments. Thank you for the visit!

Vastenhouw Lab Group Photo

Lab Photo Shoot – Winter 2015

With new faces in the lab, it was time to update our lab photo. After a fun session having our pictures taken in a boutique cafe by the Elbe, we finally had our winning picture. Thank you Vineeth Surendranath for snapping our pictures!

DIPP Predoc Course – Vastenhouw Lab

In the DIPP program, PhD students in their first year of study are required to attend four 1 week lab rotations. This week, four students joined the Vastenhouw lab and under the supervision of Shai, they carried out experiments examining the role of chromatin during zygotic genome activation. It was a fantastic week with a lot interesting results, stimulating discussions and learning. Good luck for your future PhDs!

Farewell Krishnendu

Krishnendu Khan has left the Vastenhouw Lab at the end of 2015, and will be joining the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute in Cleveland Ohio U.S.A. There he will be studying the role of macrophages on the pathology of atherosclerosis. We wish him much success in his future endeavours!

Mykola Markadeiev

Mykola was born in Ukraine and has a passion for trekking, skydiving and (suddenly) table-tennis. He studied Molecular Biology and Genetics in Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, where he took part in projects on liver regeneration and gerontology. Willing to explore Europe, the spirit of scientific adventure brought him to Dresden, doing his Masters in Regenerative Biology and Medicine. There he participated in research on murine neurogenesis, zebrafish regeneration and stem cell niches of Drosophila. He joined the Vastenhouw lab to help the project of Carine Stapel on single molecule RNA imaging.

Lucia Selfa

Lucia was born in Madrid and started her studies in Biomedical Sciences in Alcalá de Henares. By the end of her degree, her interest to discover the world dragged her to join the Erasmus program and move to Amsterdam, where she had her first contact with epigenetics during her Bachelor Thesis at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, participating in a haploid genetic screen of inhibitors targeting epigenetic modifiers.  Willing to explore other fields in science, as well as other countries and cultures, she joined the Master’s Program in Regenerative Biology and Medicine in Dresden. After looking into adult neurogenesis and planarian regeneration, she has now joined the lab to help understanding the role of histones in transcriptional regulation.